Ex-Bassist Mark Evans Writes Memoir

Mark Evans is best known for his axe-grinding in AC/DC's formative days, and his infamous fall-out with Angus Young that led to his departure.

Now, the bassist is capitalising on his Acca Dacca days by writing a tell-all memoir that details the band’s heady rise to fame.

Evans was only 19 years old when he joined AC/DC - at the time Malcolm Young was playing the bass in a four-piece line up but switched to guitar and Evans became the fifth member.

He played on the band’s biggest records with Bon Scott including ‘TNT’, ‘High Voltage’, 'Dirty Deeds Done Dirt Cheap’ and ‘Let There Be Rock’, lived the rock star life and found himself headlining world tours and partying with the likes of George Harrison, Alice Cooper and Gene Simmons.

"The aggressive attitude that AC/DC had towards Australian bands continued when we shifted overseas," reads an excerpt from the book. "The world's bigger bands became our new targets. Who the f**k did these pricks think they were? We saw a few of the so-called headline acts and straight away knew that we had nothing to fear."

Then, an epic fight with Angus Young broke out during the recording of ‘Let There Be Rock’ in 1977 - effectively ending his career with the band. He was replaced by Cliff Williams, who still plays with the band today.

Although no light has been shed on what caused the rift, it seems like those old wounds are still raw.

According to musicnews.com, when it was announced that AC/DC would be inducted into the Rock And Roll Hall Of Fame in 2003, Evans was included in the line up. However, the band objected and had him removed.

At the time, commentators noted that there was a strong case for his inclusion: of the 21 songs in AC/DC's 2003 live show, eight were originally recorded with Evans, plus Brian Johnson was allowed to qualify even though he had not been with the band for the 25-year rule that HOF insists on.

‘Dirty Deeds: My Life Inside and Outside of AC/DC’ is the first bio on the band written by a member, and is available now.

Commenti (1)

I've just read the book and it's damn good. Now I have a better understanding of the hard yards during the Bon days. Worth getting.